Singapore on yesterday said it would repatriate the chief cleric of a Muslim mosque for offensive remarks targeting Christians and Jews, a decision that aimed to “repudiate divisive speech”.

Authorities in the multi-ethnic city-state, an outpost of stability in a region where religious tension is not uncommon, are sensitive to public remarks they deem might adversely affect religious and social harmony.

During Friday prayers on Jan 6, the cleric, Nalla Mohamed Abdul Jameel Abdul Malik, made use of the phrase, “Grant us help against the Jews and the Christians,” the Ministry of Home Affairs (MHA) said on its website.

The 46-year-old, popularly known as “Nalla”, admitted making the remarks, apologised and “recognised that it was unacceptable in Singapore’s multi-racial and multi-religious context,” the ministry said in a statement.

He pleaded guilty in a Singapore court, and was fined S$4,000 ($2,862), it added. “He will be repatriated,” it said.

“Any religious leader from any religion who makes such statements will be held accountable for their actions.”

The government had “the responsibility to act quickly and firmly to repudiate divisive speech, even if the course of action is sometimes difficult,” it added.