Lok Virsa to screen classic Pakistani film Bemisaal on 9th

Lok Virsa to screen classic Pakistani film Bemisaal on 9th

December 07, 2017

Lok Virsa to screen classic Pakistani film Bemisaal on 9th

ISLAMABAD: The Mandwa Film Club of the National Institute of Folk and Traditional Heritage (Lok Virsa) would screen Pakistani classic film “Bemisaal”, released in 1975, on December 9.

The film was written and directed by Shahbab Keranvi with music by M Ashraf, starring Muhammad Ali, Shabnam, Alauddin and Saiqa in prominent roles.

It is yet another classic film of the times when Pakistani cinema was focused on highlighting social issues. The film puts a spotlight on the issues surrounding marriage, poverty and social acceptability.

The soundtrack of the film features voices of Runa Laila, Naheed Akhtar, Mehdi Hassan, Ahmed Rushdi and Akhlaq Ahmed.

The Mandwa Film Club hosts screenings of classic movies every Saturday at the Lok Virsa .–APP

Health infrastructure in rural Islamabad needs attention

ISLAMABAD: The residents on Wednesday stressed the authorities to provide required facilities in the health centres in rural areas of the federal capital.

They said that dispensaries in rural areas of Islamabad, around 33 in number, needed improvements by adding medical and paramedical staff, allocating budget for medicines and providing the first-aid facilities. They said that the people living in the rural areas depend on various rural health centres for treatment but these were functioning without basic facilities, mainly due to financial issues.

Meanwhile, the official sources within the district administration said that annual grant for these units was not sufficient to cater to the needs of the inhabitants.

When contacted, a senior official of the ICT administration said that due to absence of reasonable wage structure and allied benefits, doctors were reluctant to serve in the rural areas.

He said that several NGOs and welfare organisations had contacted them and had offered cooperation in running the rural health units.

The health department of the ICT, which looks after the rural units, has to spend on periodical health drives and preventive measures during various contingencies from the meagre budget allocated for the health sector.

Apart from the financial constraints, there are a number of other factors contributing to the state of affairs at the rural health units.

The dropout rate of doctors is high who leave because of low wages, poor accommodation and lack of other incentives.

The sources said that there was a need to improve the health infrastructure to cater to the needs of the population. They revealed that a summary had been forwarded to the relevant quarters for revamping the health infrastructure in rural areas.–APP