Islamabad - The United States is working to create equal access to education for boys and girls, Mission Director United States Agency for International Development, Jerry Bisson said yesterday.

The USAID Mission Director spoke to more than 150 participants from academia, public, private and non-profit sectors at a program sponsored by the USAID-funded Training for Pakistan Project here.

In his address, Bisson said, “Through the Training for Pakistan Project, USAID is working to create a level playing field in terms of equal access to education and work opportunities for girls and women.”

He said the US government demonstrated its commitment to increasing opportunities for Pakistani women during a panel discussion focused on education, economic participation and gender equality.

“Without a clear path for success, it becomes challenging to convince girls and their families that education is important for their future,” Bisson said.

He added, “Through the Training for Pakistan Project, USAID is working to create a level playing field in terms of equal access to education and work opportunities for girls and women.”

The discussion was moderated by Moneeza Hashmi, Mentoring Coordinator for USAID-supported Pathways to Success National Mentoring Program. Panelists included renowned painter and artist Saleema Hashmi, speaker and presenter Tanzila Khan, television actress and artist Seemi Raheel, philanthropist and beautician Musarat Misbah, and lawyer and rights activist Rakshanda Naz.

The Training for Pakistan Project works with more than 3,000 young women from Khyber Pakhtunkhwa and Sindh provinces to provide formal and non-formal, technical educational opportunities to empower young women in underserved areas of Pakistan by assisting them in acquiring marketable skills, to prepare them for the workplace, and to encourage them to explore entrepreneurial and employment endeavours.

More than 30 high-achieving and prominent women from IT, business, law, micro finance, banking, academia, arts, sports, and media have volunteered their participation in a national mentor network for 300 girls under the USAID-supported mentorship program.  The mentors meet with their adolescent mentees and their families at least twice a month to provide them guidance on overcoming challenges and paving the way for professional success.

The Training for Pakistan project is a multi-year initiative aimed at providing participant training in the areas of education, energy, economic growth and agriculture, health, and stabilization and governance.  The project utilizes a broad range of participant training resources, contributing to the capacity development of USAID partners in line with development objectives of the Government of Pakistan.

 

 

shafqat ali