According to Arab News, a Saudi woman trainer in mobile phones maintenance says that more than 5,000 women trainees have graduated and entered the labor market in the past three years.Fadwa Al-Atwi has also created a team of trainers in all regions of Saudi ...

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  • Human form of 'mad cow' disease detectable in skin

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    MIAMI -  Abnormal proteins involved in the brain-destroying Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), a human form of "mad cow" disease, are detectable in the skin, researchers said the other day, raising new concerns about transmission. It is highly unlikely that the fast-moving and fatal disease could be spread by casual contact, since the prions in the skin are at levels 1,000-100,000 times lower ...

  • Energy-saving LEDs boost light pollution worldwide

    MIAMI -  They were supposed to bring about an energy revolution - but the popularity of LED lights is driving an increase in light pollution worldwide, with dire consequences for human and animal health, researchers said Wednesday. The study in the journal Science Advances is based on satellite data showing that the Earth's night is getting brighter, and artificially lit outdoor surfaces ...

  • US climber dies scaling Mexico's highest summit

    PUEBLA:- A US mountaineer died while climbing Mexico's highest summit - the inactive Citlaltepetl volcano - with bad weather hampering efforts to recover his body, official sources said Wednesday. The unidentified climber was part of a group of four scaling the 5,610-meter (18,400-foot) mountain located on the border between the states of Puebla and Veracruz, Ruben Dario Herrera, director of ...

  • Dolly the cloned sheep was not old before her time

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    PARIS - When Dolly the sheep was put down before her seventh birthday in 2003, she was said to suffer from age-related osteoarthritis, raising red flags that clones may grow old faster. But scientists said Thursday that the fear of premature, clone-related ageing appears to have been misplaced. Dolly’s joint disease was, in fact, quite normal. Researchers in Scotland and England based their ...

  • Twin saves brother's skin in transplant first

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    PARIS - A man who had suffered burns over 95 percent of his body, putting him on the verge of death, was saved by a skin transplant from his identical twin in a world-first operation, French doctors said Thursday. The 33-year-old man, identified only as Franck, received skin grafted from his brother Eric's skull, back and thighs. Receiving a transplant from a genetically identical twin eliminates ...

  • Men stranded near crocodiles for 5 days

    SYDNEY (BBC): Two men stranded for five days in a remote part of Australia were forced to the roof of their bogged vehicle to avoid rising tides and even a crocodile, police say. Charlie Williams, 19, and Beau Bryce-Morris, 37, were on a fishing trip with a dog in Western Australia on Friday when their car became stuck. The pair made video messages during their ordeal, as a document and a message ...

  • Human form of 'mad cow' disease detectable in skin: study

    , By

    Abnormal proteins involved in the brain-destroying Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), a human form of "mad cow" disease, are detectable in the skin, researchers said Wednesday, raising new concerns about transmission. It is highly unlikely that the fast-moving and fatal disease could be spread by casual contact, since the prions in the skin are at levels 1,000-100,000 times lower than in the brain, ...

  • Polar bears crowd on Russian island in sign of Arctic change

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    A boatload of tourists in the far eastern Russian Arctic thought they were seeing clumps of ice on the shore, before the jaw-dropping realisation that some 200 polar bears were roaming on the mountain slope. "It was a completely unique situation," said Alexander Gruzdev, director of the Wrangel Island nature reserve where the encounter in September happened. "We were all gobsmacked, to be ...