Islamabad - A breakfast high in protein like eggs keeps children fuller longer than cereal or oatmeal, causing them to eat fewer calories at lunch, said a new study.

“It is really important that we identify certain types of food that can help children feel full and also moderate caloric intake, especially in children who are prone to excess weight gain,” said lead researcher Tanja Kral, associate professor at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing in the US.

The study also found that the effects of a protein-rich meal do not last throughout the day. It only impacts a midday meal, Radio Pakistan reported on Monday. The study recruited forty, eight to 10-year-old children to consume one of three, 350-calorie breakfasts (eggs, oatmeal, or cereal), then play games with research staff and then eat lunch once a week for three consecutive weeks.

On each occasion, every participant had to eat their entire breakfast, but could eat as much or as little lunch as desired. According to the research, after consuming the egg breakfast (scrambled eggs, whole wheat toast, diced peaches, and one percent milk) children reduced their energy intake at lunch by seventy calories roughly equivalent to one small chocolate-chip cookie.

Moderately active children in the same age range as those who participated in the study generally need between 1,600 and 1,800 calories daily. The 70-calorie drop at one meal equals about four percent of a child’s daily caloric needs. Eating beyond the caloric threshold, even by a little, can cause excess weight gain and obesity in children, if sustained, the researchers pointed out.

Tall women have higher cancer risk,study

A woman’s cancer risk appears to increase with her height, a new study shows. In a study researchers concluded that a woman’s cancer risk increased 13 percent with every 4 inches of height.

“We didn’t find much difference in heavy or lighter women, so it’s a pretty consistent association right across the spectrum,” said senior study author Dr Thomas Rohan, chair and professor of epidemiology and population health at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City.

In a 12-year study of 20,928 postmenopausal women, researchers noted that height was linked to breast, colon, endometrium, kidney, ovary, rectum, and thyroid cancers - as well as multiple myeloma and melanoma.

The taller the women were, the higher their cancer risk. Each 3.95 inch increase in height was associated with a 13 percent increased risk for developing any type of cancer, when researchers compared the heights of all women in the study. For example, a woman who was 5 feet 10 inches tall would have a 13 percent higher risk for cancer than a woman who was approximately 5 feet 6 inches tall. Despite their findings, Rohan and his fellow researchers hope that taller women don’t lose sleep over the matter. Instead, he hopes researchers will continue to explore the link between height and cancer, as they search for some of the underlying biological mechanisms that may be responsible for the correlation.

Sleep loss can make you fat: Study

Scientists had found evidence that a lack of sleep causes changes in brain activity that lead to people feeling hungrier and craving more fattening foods. Researchers have long pointed to a correlation between a steep rise in obesity in industrialised nations and a decline in sleep duration. A causal link was suspected, but science has not been able to explain the mechanism, until now. A team from the University of California said they used MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scans to spot changes in the brain activity of sleep- deprived test subjects.

“These findings provide an explanatory brain mechanism by which insufficient sleep may lead to the development/maintenance of obesity,” said researchers.

Twenty-three participants had their heads scanned twice; once after a full night of sleep and once after being deprived their shut-eye for a night - their brain activity measured the next day as they selected items and portion sizes from pictures of 80 different food types. Among the fatigued individuals, the researchers noted impaired activity in regions of the cortex that evaluate appetite and satiation. Simultaneously, there was a boost in areas associated with craving.

“An additionally interesting finding was that high calorie foods became more desirable to the sleep deprived participants,” said study co-author Matthew Walker of the psychology department at the University of California in Berkeley.

“Our findings indicate that (to) regularly obtain sufficient amounts of sleep may be an important factor promoting weight control, achieved by priming the brain mechanisms governing appropriate food choices.”

According to the World Health Organisation, more than 1.4 billion adults aged 20 and older were overweight in 2008 - a figure that had nearly doubled since 1980.

More than a third of adults were overweight in 2008, and 11 per cent obese, and at least 2.8 million adults die every year as a result.