ONE in four men would like to have an implant placed in their brain that connects directly to the internet, while a quarter of Brits would buy a fridge that prevents them from overeating, according to a new survey.

A One Poll survey of 2,000 people for The National Media Museum explored public attitudes to the internet, and gauged demand for innovations such as self-stocking fridges and self-driving cars. The survey also sought to establish how comfortable people are with the “internet of things”, which involves objects being linked up so they could communicate with each other and external suppliers. Men were more likely to think that linking objects to the web was a good thing, at 34% against 18% for women.  Indeed, men were found to be more comfortable overall with delegating control to gadgets. But possibly most startling was that one in four men surveyed (27%) said that they would agree to have an implant in their brain that instantly connected to the web. This was compared to just 10% of women who would do so.

Should brain implants be proved medically safe and practical, then almost a fifth (18.45%) of respondents overall said that they would agree to have the technology fitted.          –DS