The German Chancellor and the right wing of its fragile majority will attempt Monday a final time to settle their acrimonious dispute over migration policy that threatens the survival of the government and European cohesion.

This measure was rejected by the Chancellor who fears a domino effect in Europe and the end of the free movement.
The German Chancellor and the right wing of its fragile majority will attempt Monday a final time to settle their acrimonious dispute over migration policy that threatens the survival of the government and European cohesion.

In the centre of thestandoff: repression border of registered migrant beforehand by another European country wanted at all costs by the Interior Minister, Horst Seehofer, head of the conservative Bavarian CSU.

This measure was rejected by the Chancellor who fears a domino effect in Europe and the end of the free movement.

Germany was waiting for an epilogue to this duel on Sunday. But finally, after a dozen hours of meeting CSU leaders, Mr Seehofer offered to resign from his ministry and the party leader, before suspending his decision to engage in a final round of negotiations with Angela Merkel.

"I said that I was putting the two posts back and I will execute this decision in the next three days," he said in the night, suggesting that the uncertainty may still last so that the conflict enters its fourth week.

The negotiations between CSU and the chancellor's centre-right CDU party, in the presence of Mrs Merkel and Mr Seehofer, are due to start at 1500 GMT (17.00) in Berlin.

Delight of ego

Meanwhile, the fragile coalition painstakingly put in place in March, bringing together right Bavarian, Christian Democrats CDU and Social Democrats, is suspended. Just like the CDU-CSU alliance formed in 1949.

Social Democrat leader Andrea Nahles also distributed the wrong points on Monday, accusing the conservative camp in general of "irresponsibility" and the CSU in particular of "delirium of ego".

The Chancellor, who will speak in camera Monday at 12:00 GMT before the Conservative MPs, considers having met the expectations of his minister. Firstly because it has considerably hardened its migration line for two years, and then because it negotiated at the European summit last week measures "more than equivalent", according to her, to those wanted by Mr Seehofer.

But the minister surprised Sunday in front of his own by rejecting the copy of Merkel, putting his political future and therefore that of the government in the balance.

Mr Seehofer mentioned three scenarios for the future, stating that he could return to the ranks, override the objections of Angela Merkel and force backs to the borders - which would probably result in the break-up of the government - or resign.
Faced with a crisis whose epilogue is constantly pushed back, the site of the reference magazine Der Spiegel is acid: "he resigns, he does not resign. The dispute between Chancellor Merkel and his Minister of the Interior becomes always more absurd ".

AFP / Christof STACHEGerman Minister of the Interior Horst Seehofer after a meeting of his party, CSU, on 2 July 2018 in Berlin
For all the polls seem to show that the Germans do not approve of the conflict path chosen by the minister. According to a survey by the Frosa Institute for RTL, published on Monday, 67% of those surveyed judge the position of the Bavarian Conservatives "irresponsible".

Another failure, despite this hardening, the voting intentions for the CSU for regional elections in the autumn in Bavaria continue to decline in favour of the far right.
Merkel wobbles 

As a result, even some of the most conservative Bavarian barons seem to want to avoid climbing. "Nobody wants to question the government," said Bavarian Chief Executive Markus Söder before slipping that "frankly, he surprised us the Horst" with his threat of resignation.

Because if the person is so intransigent it is also because his conflict with Mrs Merkel is almost permanent since her controversial decision of 2015 to open Germany to hundreds of thousands of asylum seekers.

For the past three years, he has been denouncing this choice and his offensive appears to be aimed at the chancellor herself, who, because of her centrism and the rise of the extreme right, is perceived as an obstacle by the toughest conservatives.

Whatever the outcome of the conflict, Angela Merkel will come out at least weakened as her throne has wavered. At worst, she could be near the exit, less than a year after narrow victory in the legislative.

After almost 13 years in power, she finds herself openly challenged in her government and political family, fought in Europe, particularly by her neighbours in the East and Austria, and finally in conflict with US President Donald Trump on a multitude of topics.