Sydney

Daily Mail

When you think of French food, smelly cheese and grapes are probably the first things that come to mind.

As is pasta at the mention of Italian cuisine, or curry when asked about Indian gastronomy. So it’s not hard to see why these commonly associated foods have been plated up alongside others to recreate some of the world’s national flags in a collection of photographs.  Britain is synonymous with scone, cream and different coloured jams, with the Union Jack depicted by some of the highlights of afternoon tea, while America’s Star Spangled Banner is perfectly animated by hot dogs and dots of mustard to represent the flag’s 50 stars.

The Australian company behind the images chose meat pie and sauce to represent its home nation, making sure to cut out star-shaped holes in the pie’s crust to stick to the flag’s design while France’s Tricoleur is completed by brie, blue cheese and grapes.

Basil, pasta and tomatoes, three of the most common ingredients in Italian cuisine are used to represent the country’s green, white and red flag, while Japan’s well known red dot is formed by raw tuna on a bed of rice.  Olives and feta cheese celebrate their Greek origins and spicy orange and red curries remind viewers of Indonesian flavour.

Lebanese lavash, a soft, thin flatbread, is served with fattoush which is a bread salad made of sliced pita and vegetables. Ahead of the Sydney International Food Festival, the company has released photographs of their efforts which cleverly serve up 17 national flags made entirely from international delicacies.

The agency, WHYBIN/TBWA, is making preparations ahead of the festival’s opening in October, when hundreds of thousands are expected to gather to celebrate global cuisine for a whole month.

The festival is the largest of its kind in Australia and attracted close to 1million foodies last year. Its highlights are the Night Noodle Market and Breakfast on Bondi which invites enthusiasts to the most important meal of the day on the fames stretch of beach.