NASA’s InSight lander captures peculiar sounds on Mars

NASA’s InSight lander has detected more than 100 vibrations on Mars to date, 21 of which are strongly considered to be marsquakes, according to a release of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) on Tuesday.

The remainder could be quakes as well, but the science team has not ruled out other causes, said JPL.

InSight was equipped with a very sensitive seismometer called the Seismic Experiment for Interior Structure (SEIS), which can pick up vibrations as subtle as a breeze.

The instrument was designed to listen for marsquakes. Scientists want to study how the seismic waves of these quakes move through the planet’s interior, revealing the deep inner structure of Mars for the first time.

SEIS captured the first likely marsquake in April 23 this year since its landing on the Red Planet last November.

Far below the human range of hearing, those sonifications from SEIS had to be speeded up and slightly processed to be audible through headphones.

SEIS were provided by the Centre National d’Etudes Spatiales (CNES), the French space agency, and its partners.

NASA shared some recordings of rumblings captured in May and July. Both occurred below the human range of hearing, but were processed so we could hear them. The May quake had a magnitude of 3.7 and the July quake reached 3.3

Mars doesn’t have tectonic plates, which are the cause of quakes on Earth. Martian quakes are caused by cooling and contraction, which create stress fractures on the crust.NASA’s InSight lander captures peculiar

sounds on Mars

NASA’s InSight lander has detected more than 100 vibrations on Mars to date, 21 of which are strongly considered to be marsquakes, according to a release of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) on Tuesday.

The remainder could be quakes as well, but the science team has not ruled out other causes, said JPL.

InSight was equipped with a very sensitive seismometer called the Seismic Experiment for Interior Structure (SEIS), which can pick up vibrations as subtle as a breeze.

The instrument was designed to listen for marsquakes. Scientists want to study how the seismic waves of these quakes move through the planet’s interior, revealing the deep inner structure of Mars for the first time.

SEIS captured the first likely marsquake in April 23 this year since its landing on the Red Planet last November.

Far below the human range of hearing, those sonifications from SEIS had to be speeded up and slightly processed to be audible through headphones.

SEIS were provided by the Centre National d’Etudes Spatiales (CNES), the French space agency, and its partners.

NASA shared some recordings of rumblings captured in May and July. Both occurred below the human range of hearing, but were processed so we could hear them. The May quake had a magnitude of 3.7 and the July quake reached 3.3

Mars doesn’t have tectonic plates, which are the cause of quakes on Earth. Martian quakes are caused by cooling and contraction, which create stress fractures on the crust.

China kicks off traditional opera culture week

Xinhua (BEIJING): China has kicked off a traditional opera culture week at the Beijing Garden Expo Park, with over 370 performances to be staged. A total of 65 troupes across the country will present classic episodes of 23 forms of traditional opera, including Peking opera, Kunqu opera, Ping opera and Cantonese opera.

The culture week, jointly hosted by the Ministry of Culture and Tourism and the Beijing municipal government, will also feature Chinese folk art forms, music and dancing. Visitors will also be encouraged to experience the charms of traditional culture through interactive workshops and small-scale performances.

In addition, a variety of opera-related activities including seminars, film screening, talent shows, concerts, and exhibitions will be held during the week.