KIGALI (AFP) - France played an active role in the 1994 Rwanda genocide, a report unveiled Tuesday by the Rwandan government said, naming French political and military officials it says should be prosecuted. The indicting report accused a raft of top French politicians of involvement in the massacres, threatening to further mar relations between the two countries, which severed diplomatic ties in November 2006. "French forces directly assassinated Tutsis and Hutus accused of hiding Tutsis... French forces committed several rapes on Tutsi survivors," said a Justice Ministry statement released after the report was presented in Kigali. The 500-page report alleged that France was aware of preparations for the genocide, contributed to planning the massacres and actively took part in the killing. It named former French prime minister Edouard Balladur, former foreign minister Alain Juppe and then-president Francois Mitterrand, who died in 1996, among 13 French politicians accused of playing a role in the massacres.Dominique de Villepin, who was then Juppe's top aide and later became prime minister, was also among those listed in the Rwandan report. The report names 20 military officials as being responsible. France's Foreign Ministry refused to comment, saying it was waiting to see the document. "We have not yet read the report which has not been sent to us by the Rwandan government. We are therefore not in a position to react," said a foreign ministry spokesman. "The overwhelming nature of France's support to the Rwandan policy of massacres... shows the complicity of French political and military officials in the preparation and execution of the genocide," the statement said. Justice Minister Tharcisse Karugarama presented the report to the Press in Kigali, more than two years after a special commission tasked with probing France's role in the genocide began its work. The statement said the military and humanitarian Operation Turquoise carried out by the French in Rwanda between June and August 1994 abetted the killings perpetrated by the extremist Interahamwe Hutu militia. The French military "did not challenge the infrastructure of genocide, notably the checkpoints manned by the Interahamwes. "They clearly requested that the Interahamwes contine to man those checkpoints and kill Tutsis attempting to flee," the statement added. "Considering the seriousness of the alleged crimes, the Rwandan government has urged the relevant authorities to bring the accused French politicians and military officials to justice," the statement said. Karugarama hinted that Rwanda could launch a legal challenge against some of the officials named in the report.