ISLAMABAD – While daily dialysis can boost the overall health of kidney disease patients, it also can put them at higher risk for certain complications, a new study finds.

About 2 million people worldwide receive dialysis treatments. In dialysis, patients use a machine to artificially do what healthy kidneys should: eliminate waste and unwanted water from the blood. Standard dialysis involves three treatments a week, while frequent dialysis involves treatment once each day, HealthDay News Reported.

Of course, frequent dialysis requires accessing the blood more often, which typically is done using a long-lasting puncture site through which blood can be removed and returned.

Having the blood cleansed more frequently does typically improve patients’ health and quality of life. It wasn’t known, however, whether these patients also had any higher risk for complications related to repeated use of the blood-access site.

In this study, researchers led by Dr. Rita Suri, of Western University and Lawson Health Research Institute in London, Canada, conducted two 12-month clinical trials involving 245 patients. The patients were randomly selected to receive either in-center daily dialysis (six days a week) or standard dialysis (three days per week). Another 87 patients received either frequent home-based dialysis or standard dialysis.

In the first hospital-based trial, 31 percent of the 245 patients had to undergo repair of the blood-access site, lost use of the site or were hospitalized due to problems with the site. Complication rates were higher among the frequent-dialysis group: There were 33 repairs and 15 losses in the frequent-dialysis group compared with 17 repairs, 11 losses and one hospitalization in the standard-dialysis group. Overall, the risk for a problem with the blood-access site was 76 percent higher in the frequent-dialysis group than in the standard-dialysis group, the researchers reported.

Similar trends were seen in the home-based trial, but the results were not statistically significant, according to the study results, which were published online Feb. 7 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

The findings are the first to show that frequent dialysis may have potentially harmful effects on the blood-access site, and provide valuable information for dialysis patients and their doctors, Suri said in a journal news release. Two kidney experts said the results are not surprising, since dialysis is always a balancing act between risks and benefits.

“Frequent dialysis has been an area of intense interest since the publication in 2010 of a study from the Frequent Hemodialysis Network (FHN) that found a reduced rate of death and other events with frequent dialysis,” said Dr. Steven Fishbane, director of clinical research in the department of medicine at North Shore-LIJ Health System in Great Neck, N.Y.

But he said the new study is a reminder that there is a downside in terms of complications. “Further work will be necessary to determine how to reduce these complications given the important improvement in patient health with frequent dialysis,” he said.

Dr. Brian Radbill is associate professor of medicine in the department of nephrology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, in New York City. He was also involved in the FHN trial that helped confirm the benefits of daily dialysis. Radbill said it was “not surprising” that daily treatments also increased patients’ risk for complications.

The needles used to gain access to the bloodstream are relatively large and frequent use raises the odds of complications such as clots and aneurysms, Radbill said. In turn, those complications may lead to burdensome surgeries or loss of the blood-access site altogether.

Exercise before school improves concentration

Cycling or walking to school increases a child’s ability to concentrate in the classroom, the results of a Danish study published. Children who were driven to school, or who took public transport, performed less well in a test measuring concentration levels, than those who had walked or cycled, a joint study by researchers at the universities in Copenhagen and Aarhus found, Arab news Reported.

“The exercise one uses to transport oneself to school is reflected in the level of concentration one has circa four hours later,” said Niels Egelund, a co-author of the report.

The results surprised the researchers, as their hypothesis originally focused on the effects of eating breakfast and lunch on pupils’ ability to concentrate.

“The results showed that having breakfast and lunch has an impact, but not very much compared to having exercised,” Egelund told.

“As a third-grade pupil, if you exercise and bike to school, your ability to concentrate increases to the equivalent of someone half a year further in their studies,” he added.

In the survey, taken by 19,527 pupils aged five to 19 years, participants were asked about their exercise habits and were then given a basic test measuring their concentration.

“Most people know the feeling of being refreshed after having exercised, but it is surprising that the effect lasts for so long,” Egelund said.

Faulty water filtration plants annoy locals

ISLAMABAD (APP) - Most of water filtration plants in the federal capital is in very poor condition as many plants are broken and have leaking taps.

The water filtration plants at F-6, G-6, G-7,I-10 and I-8 Sitara Market are in dilapidated conditions as the taps are broken and huge amount of water is being wasted daily.

The residents of the area said that official time for water is 10:00am to 10:00pm but still they were facing water shortage during the time fixed by the authorities concerned.

They maintained that they had to wait to get water because of the rush of the people waiting for their turn as only two taps are operational at most of the water filtration plants.

Ahmed Ali, a resident of F-6, alleged that due to negligence of the concern authority, the water filtration plants installed at various sectors for provision of clean drinking water were neither repaired nor their filters were replaced on regular basis.

The residents urged the authorities to take immediate measures for the timely provision of clean drinking water and maintenance of these plants.

Residents of G-7 sector said that it was the fundamental right of every citizen to have clean drinking water but sector G-7 and F-6 were still lacking this facility as there was no installation of water filtration plant.

An official of CDA told that filtration plants have been installed by the authority in different sectors to facilitate the residents with clean drinking water. He said that the civic body would install same plants in other areas of the federal capital. He also advised the residents to avoid misuse of clean drinking water.