ISLAMABAD - The Foreign Ministry of Pakistan on Tuesday issued a travel advisory for all citizens traveling to India.

Foreign Office spokesperson said in a statement that more than 600 pilgrims who are scheduled to visit Ajmer Sharif for the annual Urs this month might also be at serious risk. He said that the government wishes to advise its citizens who are planning to travel to India to exercise due caution and care while travelling to various parts of India. The spokesman also called upon the Indian government to take appropriate measures for the security of Pakistani travelers.  In a related development, two family members of Pakistani prisoner Sanaullah Ranjay, who is in a Chandigarh hospital after being attacked in a Jammu jail, have reached India Tuesday after being granted permission from Indian officials. Sanaullah Ranjay suffered massive head injuries in a prison in the northern city of Jammu in an apparent tit-for-tat attack after an Indian prisoner Sarabjit Singh was attacked by jail inmates.

Officials of the Pakistani High Commission met with Ranjay’s brother-in-law and nephew at Wagah border. Sanaullah’s relatives would seek his release from the Indian govt to bring him back home.

The relatives were later taken to the city of Chandigarh where Ranjay was airlifted last week to be treated at a state-run hospital. In a bulletin, the hospital said he remains “critically sick” and in “deep coma.”

On Monday Pakistani High Commissioner Salman Bashir visited the hospital. A prisoner identified as a former Indian army soldier just 24 hours after Singh’s death in a Lahore jail attacked Ranjay, from the Pakistani city of Sialkot.

AFP adds: Relatives of a Pakistani prisoner savagely attacked in an Indian jail travelled to India Tuesday to visit the inmate who remains critically ill in a ‘deep coma’ in hospital.

Sanaullah Haq suffered massive head injuries in a prison in an apparent tit-for-tat attack after an Indian prisoner, Sarabjit Singh, was fatally assaulted in Pakistan.

Sanaullah’s brother-in-law and nephew, in India on a 15-day visa, were met by officials of the Pakistani High Commission (embassy) at Wagha, the land crossing between the two countries.

They told reporters at Wagha, 29 kilometres from the northern Indian city of Amritsar, that they would urge the Indian government to release Sanaullah, a convicted murderer, so that they could take him back to their home country. The relatives were later taken to the city of Chandigarh where Sanaullah was airlifted last week to be treated at a state-run hospital. In a bulletin, the hospital said he remains ‘critically sick’ and in ‘deep coma’.

On Monday Pakistani High Commissioner Salman Bashir visited the hospital. Sanaullah, from the Pakistani city of Sialkot, was attacked by a prisoner identified as a former Indian army soldier just 24 hours after Singh’s death in a Lahore jail.

Singh, convicted in Pakistan for spying and a string of deadly blasts, died last week and was cremated with state honours in his native village in northwestern India.

Last weekend demonstrators took to the streets in Azad Kashmir to protest against the attack on Sanaullah in India.

The prison violence could fuel tensions between nuclear-armed India and Pakistan, whose relations were hit by a border flare-up earlier this year.