TORONTO - Al Pacino was so excited to be promoting his latest film “Manglehorn” at the Toronto film festival Sunday that he knocked over glass after glass of water at a press conference.

He appeared along with director David Gordon Green (“Pineapple Express”) and co-stars Holly Hunter (“The Piano,” “Saving Grace”) and writer-director and occasional actor Harmony Korine (“Spring Breakers”). As Green was saying he liked Pacino’s “unpredictable, playful quality... as an actor,” Pacino accidentally knocked over a glass on a table. Moments later, another glass was knocked over accidentally, and another, and another.

Running off to grab towels to mop up, Pacino’s distinctive voice could be heard shouting in jest: “I’m leaving, they destroyed the press conference! They threw stuff all over the place!” “I’m just so excited (about the movie),” he said when he came back. “Manglehorn,” a Texas-set story of a locksmith in a small town who lives alone with a cat and cannot forget the love of his life, premiered last week in Venice before coming to screens in Toronto.

Pacino also appears in Barry Levinson’s “The Humbling,” which premiered at the festival this week too.

“I’ve been on so many red carpets,” Pacino said. “I started to like it. Just the other day I thought, ‘Hey this ain’t bad.’ You can make friends on it, you can meet different people, old friends come together.”

More seriously Pacino on his role in “Manglehorn” commented: “I believe when a director sees you in a role that you know you’re going to get involved with something that they see and I know they’ll be supportive.”

“That was ‘The Godfather.’ Francis Coppola wanted me in ‘The Godfather’ above everybody else; nobody else wanted me and he did, and he stuck with that and he believed me. And I was in it knowing the whole time about how supportive he was.”

After 40 years in the film business, he said he feels that he’s in the “luxurious position of being able to choose something I want to do.

Pressed as to whether the new film was deserving of a second Academy award — the first was in 1993 for “Scent of a Woman” — he quipped: “Of course!”