• Spain (1964, 2008, 2012) and Germany (1972, 1980 - both as West Germany - 1996) are the competition's most successful sides having lifted the trophy three times each. Only France (1984, 2000) have also triumphed more than once.

• Only three teams have ever won the UEFA European Championship on home soil: Spain (1964), Italy (1968) and France (1984).

• In 2012 Spain became the first nation to retain the Henri Delaunay Cup, having also won in 2008. The Soviet Union (1960, 1964) and West Germany (1972, 1976) returned to the final as holders only to lose.

• Eight players have appeared in two victorious finals - Iker Casillas, Sergio Ramos, Andrés Iniesta, Xavi Hernández, Cesc Fàbregas and David Silva all started Spain's triumphs in 2008 and 2012, with Fernando Torres starting in 2008 and coming on four years later and Xabi Alonso coming on in the 2008 final and starting in 2012. Rainer Bonhof twice picked up a winners' medal with West Germany (1972, 1980) but did not play in either tournament.

• Berti Vogts was a winner as a player with West Germany in 1972 and as Germany coach in 1996, making him the only man to triumph in both roles.

• Since 1980, when the final tournament expanded to become an eight-team event, the hosts or co-hosts have only failed to reach the semi-finals - or better - four times: Italy (1980), Belgium (2000), Austria and Switzerland (2008) and Poland and Ukraine (2012).

• UEFA Euro 2016 is Germany's 12th successive UEFA European Championship final tournament - they last missed out as West Germany in 1968.

• Germany are appearing in the finals for the 12th time, one more than Russia (includes appearances as USSR). This is the tenth tournament for Spain.

• Six teams have qualified for the finals with a perfect record, including England this time round. The others are France (1992 and 2004), the Czech Republic (2000) and Spain and Germany (2012).

• The Netherlands' 6-1 defeat of Yugoslavia in the UEFA Euro 2000 quarter-finals is the biggest win in a final tournament. Three games have finished 5-0, most recently Sweden's 2004 defeat of Bulgaria.

• Three teams have held the UEFA European Championship and FIFA World Cup at the same time. West Germany won the European title in 1972 and added the world crown two years later, while France claimed the 1998 World Cup and UEFA Euro 2000 and Spain triumphed at UEFA Euro 2008 and the 2010 World Cup. Spain's 2012 Euro victory made them the first country to win three major tournaments in a row; West Germany were within a shoot-out of achieving the feat before their 1976 loss to Czechoslovakia.

• For West Germany, Sepp Maier, Franz Beckenbauer, Hans-Georg Schwarzenbeck, Paul Breitner, Uli Hoeness and Gerd Müller played in both those finals, while Fabien Barthez, Marcel Desailly, Bixente Lizarazu, Lilian Thuram, Didier Deschamps, Youri Djorkaeff, Patrick Vieira, Zinédine Zidane and Christophe Dugarry achieved the feat for France.

• Iker Casillas, Sergio Ramos, Carles Puyol, Joan Capdevila, Andrés Iniesta, Xavi Hernández, Cesc Fàbregas, Xabi Alonso and Fernando Torres played in Spain's 2008 Euro final win and the 2010 World Cup success. Casillas, Ramos, Iniesta, Xavi, Fàbregas, Alonso and Torres appeared in all three of Spain's final wins between 2008 and 2012.

• In addition to the 24 players mentioned above, Dino Zoff (Italy 1968, 1982) and Germany's Thomas Hässler and Jürgen Klinsmann (1990, 1996) also featured in two final triumphs.

• In 2012 Spain's Chelsea FC pair Fernando Torres and Juan Mata joined a small group of players to have appeared in European Cup and UEFA European Championship final victories in the same year. Luis Suárez achieved the feat with FC Internazionale Milano and Spain in 1964, while in 1988 PSV Eindhoven quartet Hans van Breucklen, Ronald Koeman, Barry van Aerle and Gerald Vanenburg were all in the victorious Netherlands side.

• Wim Kieft and Nicolas Anelka narrowly missed out on this club. A European Champion Clubs' Cup finalist with PSV in 1988, Kieft was an unused substitute in the Netherlands' European Championship triumph, while Anelka was similarly thwarted with France in 2000 after appearing in Real Madrid CF's UEFA Champions League final. Anelka's

Madrid team-mate Christian Karembeu holds the unique position of being an unused substitute in European Cup and European Championship final victories in the same year.

• In 2008 Germany's Michael Ballack, then with Chelsea FC, became the first player to appear in European Cup and Euro final defeats in the same year.

• Four players have followed European Cup final defeat with Euro victory in the same year: Ignacio Zoco and Amancio Amaro (1964, Real Madrid CF and Spain) and Manny Kaltz and Horst Hrubesch (1980, Hamburger SV and West Germany).

• Gábor Király is the oldest player to have appeared in a UEFA European Championship finals; he was aged 40 years 86 days in Hungary's 4-0 loss against Belgium at UEFA Euro 2016.

• The Netherlands' Jetro Willems is the youngest player to have featured; he was 18 years 71 days in the 1-0 defeat by Denmark at the 2012 finals.

• Ten players have appeared in four final tournaments: Lothar Matthäus, Peter Schmeichel, Alessandro Del Piero, Edwin van der Sar, Lilian Thuram, Olof Mellberg, Cristiano Ronaldo, Zlatan Ibrahimovic, Bastian Schweinsteiger and Gianluigi Buffon.

• Austria's Ivica Vastic is the oldest player to have scored, having found the net in a 1-1 draw against Poland at UEFA Euro 2008 aged 38 years and 257 days.

• Johan Vonlanthen was 18 years and 141 days old when scoring in Switzerland's 3-1 defeat by France at UEFA Euro 2004, making him the youngest player to have struck at the finals.

• Russia's Dmitri Kirichenko scored the fastest goal in a UEFA European Championship; his effort against Greece at UEFA Euro 2004 was timed at 67 seconds.

• There have been eight hat-tricks in a final tournament: Dieter Müller (1976), Klaus Allofs (1980), Michel Platini (1984, twice), Marco van Basten (1988), Sérgio Conceição (2000), Patrick Kluivert (2000) and David Villa (2008).