Coronavirus cases and deaths continued to rise across Latin America on Wednesday as the region struggled to contain the spread of infections.

Peru

Peru reported 165 new deaths from COVID-19 in the past 24 hours, according to health officials.

The death toll climbed to 5,903, while the number of confirmed cases rose by 5,087 to 208,823.

At least 98,031 people have recovered from the virus.

The country reported its first case on March 6 and its first death on March 20.

Ecuador

Ecuador reported 30 more deaths from the coronavirus, said the Health Ministry.

The death toll climbed to 3,720, while the number of confirmed cases rose by 523 to 44,440. 

The total number of recoveries in the country has been reported as 21,862.

Guatemala

In Guatemala, 22 more people died from the coronavirus over the past 24 hours, bringing the tally to 289.

 The total number of cases in the country rose to 7,866 with 363 new infections, while 1,413 people have recovered so far.

Brazil

In Brazil, 1,274 more fatalities over the past 24 hours raised the death toll to 39,680, according to the Health Ministry.

The total case count in the world’s second worst-hit country reached 772,416 as 32,913 more people tested positive for COVID-19.

The state of Sao Paulo re-opened its economy on June 10, despite reporting a record 24-hour increase of 340 new deaths, allowing the public to go out.

The state administration of Sao Paulo has allowed shops and real estate agencies to open for four hours a day starting June 10, provided that it is during off-peak hours.

Also, as of June 11, shopping malls will be open in the four-hour period they will choose between 06.00-10.00 in the morning or 16.00-20.00 in the afternoon. No store will accept more than 20% of customer capacity.

Since first appearing in Wuhan, China last December, the novel coronavirus has spread to at least 188 countries and regions.

The pandemic has killed more than 416,000 people worldwide, with over 7.36 million confirmed cases and more than 3.4 million recoveries, according to figures compiled by Johns Hopkins University of the US.