TOKYO

A Japanese court has ordered Google to delete search results linking the claimant to a crime he did not commit, the latest in a series of rulings around the world on what search engines should tell users.

The Tokyo District Court this week placed a provisional order that Google delete about half of 237 entries that appear after the plaintiff’s name is entered, the Asahi Shimbun newspaper and other local media reported.

The man requested the injunction in June, arguing that these search results suggest he was involved in a crime and that this constitutes a threat to his current way of life and compromises his privacy, the Asahi said. The ruling comes after the EU’s top court said in May that individuals have the right to ask Google to delete personal data produced by its search engine.

Individuals have a right “to be forgotten”, under certain circumstances when their personal data becomes outdated or inaccurate, the European Court of Justice said.

Google has received more than 100,000 requests for the removal of nearly half a million pages since the ECJ ruling earlier this year. The Japanese injunction, which only applies to one specific set of data, is a provisional ruling lacking the same sweeping power as the legislative changes in Europe. It is not precedent-setting and grants no rights to anyone other than the claimant.