UNITED NATIONS - A second catastrophe could result in cyclone-hit Myanmar unless the country allows more access for quick dispatch of aid to the victims, Elizabeth Byrs of the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) has warned. Despite some progress, efforts to help the 1.5 million people impacted by Cyclone Nargis must be enhanced, she said in Geneva on Tuesday, according to a press statement issued at UN Headquarters in New York. Some 12 days after the cyclone stuck Myanmar, the UN and its partners have reached 270,000 at-risk people, less than a third of those affected, Ms. Byrs said.  Heavy rains have been forecast, further impeding aid efforts. And she called for an air and sea corridor to channel aid in large quantities as quickly as possible. The official death toll reported by the Government has reached almost 32,000, with over 34,000 others missing. On Monday, Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon voiced his "immense frustration" with the slow pace of relief efforts and called on the South-East Asian nation's authorities to do the most it can to prevent the situation from deteriorating further. Ms. Byrs said, however, that there have been some encouraging signs, with the Government making some initial moves to ease restrictions. Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs John Holmes said yesterday that 34 new visas had been granted to UN personnel, but Ms. Byrs said today that this is not enough to respond to a disaster of this magnitude. "Unless more aid gets into the country - very quickly - we face an outbreak of infectious diseases that could dwarf today's crisis," the Secretary-General stressed in a press conference at UN Headquarters in New York yesterday. "I therefore call, in the most strenuous terms, on the Government of Myanmar to put its people's lives first. It must do all that it can to prevent the disaster from becoming even more serious." The UN refugee agency announced today that more than 40 tons of its shelter supplies - including plastic sheets, blankets, kitchen sets and tents - have reached Yangon, Myanmar's largest city in the past 24 hours. Half of these items were airlifted in from Dubai. "Our staff are at the Yangon airport to claim the items for immediate dispatch to areas affected by the cyclone," said Jennifer Pagonis, spokesperson for the UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR). The other half of the supplies were driven in overland from the Thai-Myanmar border in two trucks, carrying items from UNHCR's stockpiles for refugee camps along the Thai border, in a two-day journey through heavy rains. The agency immediately handed the items, expected to benefit 10,000 people, over to non-governmental and community-based organizations to be distributed in the hardest-hit areas of Yangon and the Irrawaddy delta.