Get Out

1. Get Out (2017) - By far one of the greatest psychological horrors ever released. It’s a flawless balance of serious racial themes and a parodical look at ‘positive’ discrimination as an African-American played by Daniel Kaluuya gets caught up in a cult of white body-snatchers. Well deserving of Jordan Peele’s Oscar for Best Original Screenplay.

 

It Follows

3. It Follows (2014) - Another interpretive project that manages not to rely on jump scares, but instead manipulates genre tropes in such a way that you end up with a unique teen horror with nail-biting suspense. Rather than focusing on the origins of this monster that follows sexually active teens around, killing them before they can ‘pass it on’, this low-budget indie thriller directed by David Robert Mitchell is more of a tale of caution.

 

 

A Quiet Place

5. A Quiet Place (2018) - The latest horror masterpiece to reach theatres and a surprise hit for director John Krasinski, who stars alongside his real life wife Emily Blunt. A family live life from day-to-day in complete silence, trying to avoid creatures that hunt by sound alone. Interestingly, for a film that relies on an effective score, composer Marco Beltrami couldn’t afford a full orchestra with the budget. But in a movie about the importance of silence, that was probably an advantage.

 

 

 

Green Room

7. Green Room (2015) - Patrick Stewart as a skinhead. Enough said, really. He certainly proves that his acting prowess can extend far beyond that of Shakespeare and ‘Star Trek’. The premise is more crime-thriller; a group of liberal punk rockers getting trapped in a neo-Nazi bar after witnessing a murder; but it develops into a claustrophobic panic-fest that gets increasingly more violent, though never gratuitous.

 

 

Don’t Breathe

9. Don’t Breathe (2016) - A lot of people might say it would serve anyone right to be mercilessly hunted down by the disabled owner of the house of which they were burgling. But this is a lesson in underestimating people. Blind does not mean weaker. And sometimes the burglar isn’t the one committing the worst crime.

 

 

The Babadook

2. The Babadook (2014) - Taking the very basic theme of that monster in the closet, Jennifer Kent’s directorial debut is a masterstroke in classic horror. Many children have an irrational fear of a would-be benign character, but this turns that fear on its head when the book character comes to life and wreaks havoc on the lives of a woman and her son. Doing away with jump scares and concluding with an introspective message relating to mental health, few recent horror releases have been as layered as ‘The Babadook’.

 

Housebound

4. Housebound (2014) - Few films can twist into a completely different direction with such dex  more of a stand-alone project. It’s one that makes you wonder where the true villainy lies within the story; is the protagonist being held hostage by a highly suspicious doomsday cult leader? Or is there real danger lurking above the surface of their bunker? The horror never seems to end.

 

 

The Witch

6. The Witch (2015) - Slow-burning and eerie, this Robert Eggers flick is everything the New World was afraid of in the 1600s. Disturbing imagery laced with dissonant tones from composer Mark Korven, it’s certainly a minimalist picture. But the beauty in it is being unable to shake the intense suspicion and discomfort that rubs off on the viewers throughout the story.

 

 

10 Cloverfield Lane

8. 10 Cloverfield Lane (2016) - Intended as the second installment in the ‘Cloverfield’ franchise, it is more of a stand-alone project. It’s one that makes you wonder where the true villainy lies within the story; is the protagonist being held hostage by a highly suspicious doomsday cult leader? Or is there real danger lurking above the surface of their bunker? The horror never seems to end.

 

 

The Conjuring

10. The Conjuring (2013) - The first of this Ed and Lorraine Warren franchise which turned out to be surprisingly brilliant, considering it had the likes of ‘Insidious’, ‘Sinister’ and the ‘Paranormal Activity’ franchise to fare against. It’s everything you want out of a ghost story; a murderous ghost, possession and a small dose of true events. So even if the concept isn’t entirely original, it’s still pretty damn terrifying.