An man dubbed Israels Josef Fritzl was indicted yesterday on charges including enslavement, rape and incest over a cult-like harem in which he fathered dozens of children with 32 women. The indictment against Goel Ratzon, 60, says that he positioned himself as a godlike figure to the women, whom he enticed into a worship of him that included following a rulebook that dictated their lives. He sired at least 49 children with his wives, who tattooed themselves with his face and name, and is also accused of raping underage girls. Ratzon created an image of an omnipotent one who was blessed with supernatural powers and the ability to heal, destroy and cast curses, police said. Through this total control the defendant led the women to completely scrap their character and devote their existence to satisfy his needs, including his financial and sexual needs. In a documentary produced by Israeli television last year, Mr Ratzons wives were filmed feeding him and stroking his grey beard and wispy hair. Police said that his wives have now sobered and are coming forward with evidence against him. Almost all of the women incriminated him when questioned, they said, and will testify during the trial. Mr Ratzon maintained his innocence when speaking outside his hearing at the Tel Aviv Magistrates Court yesterday. They can say things about me that are not true. They are pressuring me during investigation, he said. He added that the book of rules published by the media and catalogued by police was an invention. His wives and other women he is accused of molesting have depicted Mr Ratzon as an expert manipulator. In each case he is said to have lured women away from their social networks, including friends and family. He ridiculed and insulted them, yet. Mr Ratzon convinced them that their entire existence including mental and physical wellbeing derived from himself. The supreme goal of the wives was to bear him children glorifying him while serving him, police said. Mr Ratzon is accused of raping underage girls while convincing them that he would one day marry them. One woman said that she was raped by Mr Ratzon on a near daily basis between the ages of 15 to 17. In another case he convinced an underage girl that he had supernatural powers and distanced her from her family. He then took a shower with the girl and raped her. When she complained of pain, he told her, Dont worry, youll get used to it. Mr Ratzon knew that the young girl was subject to his charismatic influence. He nurtured and cultivated her in such a way that it prohibited her from granting her free agreement, police said. They added that the girls father managed to locate her and forcibly remove her from Mr Ratzon. Women living with Mr Ratzon were asked to turn over all their wages and were forbidden from making telephone calls or talking to other men. If they broke the rules they would pay a fine or be physically punished. The women wore conservative orthodox dresses covering their entire bodies and bore tattoos of their captors face and name. All his offspring had names with a variation on his, Goel, which means redeemer in Hebrew. Psychologists and welfare officials who have spoken to Mr Ratzons wives have said that they are concerned for their mental wellbeing. Becoming aware of the brainwashing they were under has been traumatic, police said. But some of the women have begun meeting with their families again, while many of the women who had tattooed Mr Ratzons name and likeness on their bodies have now asked that they be removed. However, police said that some of the women have remained loyal to Mr Ratzon and refused to condemn his treatment of them. Mr Ratzons case has met with outrage amonhg the Israeli public, who question why he was not arrested sooner. Police have said that they were aware of Mr Ratzon for years but could not gather enough evidence for his arrest until women came forward and filed complaints with welfare authorities. (The Times)