- UNITED NATIONS - Pakistan has called for the implementation of United Nations Security Council resolutions without discrimination and also with equal force irrespective of their being rooted in the sanctions provisions of the U.N. Chapter. "Selective implementation creates an unjust environment, deepening conflicts and compounding the suffering of the peoples," K.K. Agha, the Pakistani delegate, told the General Assembly's legal committee on Monday. Agha, who holds the title of ambassador-at-large, also called for strengthening the rule of law for realizing social and economic justice, and international peace and stability. He urged that resolutions and decisions of the Security Council needed to be implemented uniformly and without discrimination, and also with equal force, irrespective of their falling within Chapter VI or Chapter VII of the U.N. Charter. Those Charter provisions lay the groundwork for sanctions or the use of force to implement the resolutions. "Situations posing a threat to international peace and security must be dealt with by the United Nations, especially by the Security Council, in line with the principles enshrined in the UN Charter," Ambassador Agha said in a debate on 'The Rule of Law at National and International Levels'." "In particular, the use of force should be consistent with the Charter's principles relating to collective security," he added. The Pakistan delegate said the rule of law played a pivotal role in post-conflict divided societies, and the principles of the rule of law were critical for the implementation of political, economic, cultural, religious and environmental rights. Although each conflict situation was unique with its own dynamics, Ambassador Agha said there was a need to integrate justice and rule of law requirements into any international or United Nations involvement in post-conflict societies.  Those societies had to be helped to stand on their own feet through building national institution capacity, particularly in the judicial area. To that end, he said, good use of indigenous and informal traditions for administration of justice and settlement of disputes could be made possible, if those were consistent with international standards. In his speech, Agha also told the committee that Pakistan has both a sovereign Parliament and an elected President fully reflecting the aspirations of the people. "The Pakistani people strongly believe that democracy and rule of law are intertwined." Pakistan's Constitution, he said, demands appropriate measures to enable women to participate in all spheres of life and community activities,  safeguard the rights and interests of the minorities, including their representation in the federal and provincial services, and making provisions for securing just and humane conditions for work and ensuring that children and women are not employed in vocations unsuited to their age or sex. Agha paid high tributes to former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto. He said throughout her "long and distinguished political career" strove for the empowerment of women, democracy and the promotion of the rule of law. "Noble causes which lead to her making the ultimate sacrifice for the benefit of the Pakistani people."