The US president threatened on Wednesday to adjourn the federal legislature in order push through a series of recess appointments.

US President Donald Trump claimed on Wednesday there had been “a concerted effort" by congressional Democrats "to make life difficult” by refusing to approve his nominations for several vacant offices.

The Senate is in recess until May 4, although it is possible for it to be recalled if necessary.

Trump noted there are currently 129 nominees "stuck in the Senate because of partisan obstruction," including the director of national intelligence, two members of the Federal Reserve board of governors and several undersecretaries of different US government departments.

"The Senate should either fulfill its duty and vote on my nominees, or it should formally adjourn so that I can make recess appointments," he said, bemoaning "pro forma" meetings in which no Senate business actually happens. "We have to do it, and we have to do whatever we have to do."

“Whether it’s Russia, Russia, Russia, or whether it's impeachment hoax ... it’s always a waste of time,” he told reporters outside the White House.

"If the House will not agree to that adjournment, I will exercise my constitutional authority to adjourn both chambers of Congress," Trump said, accusing lawmakers of "a dereliction of duty" and "a scam" for "leaving town during a crisis."

He later told a reporter who sought clarification that "it's very simple: if they don’t act on getting these people approved … we are going to do something I prefer not doing … but will do."

"We have the right to do whatever we want," Trump later said, "but we wouldn't do that, and I don't think there would be any reason to do that."

Article II, Section 3 of the US Constitution gives the president the power to both call Congress into a special session as well as to adjourn both houses of Congress if they cannot agree on a time to do so. However, a president has never exercised the latter of these rights.

The remarks come just days after Trump claimed his "authority is total" with regards to reopening US states from lockdowns, as US governors form their own regional plans for ending travel and socialization restrictions.

Republican senator and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said in a statement Wednesday evening that he had spoken with Trump about ways to confirm the president's nominees considered critical to combating the COVID-19 pandemic, but that it would require the consent of Democratic senator Charles Schumer, who leads the minority Democrats in the chamber.