Amid growing American frustration with Pakistan's handling of militancy, the government appears less willing than ever to challenge insurgent groups and is more inclined to make peace with them, a report in Washington Post said on Monday. In a series of recent statements, Pakistani officials have rejected the notion of robust military action against insurgents based in its tribal belt and instead called for truces. At a recent summit, political leaders issued a resolution that did not condemn terrorism but said their policy is dialogue. The decree was widely viewed as having been rubber-stamped by the powerful military, whose top two figures briefed the conference. The approach has puzzled U.S. officials and renewed debate in Pakistan about how to handle insurgents who have killed thousands in attacks nationwide. Much remains unclear about the potential for peacemaking, including which militant groups would be included or willing. But some analysts say Pakistan has lost the resolve to battle homegrown insurgents who many here view as disgruntled brethren. "Everyone went along with what the army wanted" at the recent political summit, said Rahimullah Yousafzai, a Pakistani journalist and expert on militancy in the northwest. "It became obvious that the military has no appetite for military operations." Many here express skepticism about talks, arguing that such efforts had failed in the past. But the idea is backed by Islamic parties and other political leaders. In interviews, politicians and security officials said Pakistan views the Pakistani Taliban, an umbrella insurgent group that is an offshoot of the Afghan movement, as splintered enough to be open to peace deals mediated through tribal elders or clerics. And the United States, they note, is supporting a similar approach in Afghanistan. "If by giving a chance to peace, any terror is eliminated, it's the best option," Interior Minister Rehman Malik, a leading ruling party figure, said in an interview. He added that he had received armistice offers from militants: "They want to talk." Meanwhile, Pakistan is jockeying for inclusion in any Afghan political settlement, which security officials here believe will bring Afghan Taliban representatives into the government. The army therefore sees little incentive to antagonize Pakistan insurgents, who commingle with their Afghan counterparts, security analysts said. Pakistani Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani called last month's political conference as tensions with the United States soared over American allegations of Pakistani state support for the Haqqani network, an Afghan group based in the Pakistani tribal area of North Waziristan. Participants, in a rare show of unity, unanimously rejected the U.S. claims and called for a "new direction and policy with a focus on peace and reconciliation" with "our own people in the tribal areas." An American official said the United States was unsure what to make of the resolution. "We'll be watching, of course, and asking through military channels what the [Pakistanis] have in mind," said the official, who spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss a sensitive relationship. The United States has stepped up a campaign of drone strikes against the Haqqani network, targeting the group with several strikes in recent days. Taliban reaction to the Pakistani overture has been wary. One top commander, Faqir Mohammed, was quoted by local media as saying he welcomed talks - but that they must lead to the establishment of Islamic law. Mohammed later denied willingness to talk. "There have been contacts between the government and militants through indirect channels," said a tribal elder from the Waziristan region. "Both sides are seeking guarantees before starting." A Pakistani intelligence official pointed to the recent defection of one Pakistani Taliban commander, Fazal Saeed Haqqani, as an argument for truces, which he said exploit insurgent infighting. Pakistan, the official said, "met Haqqani's demands," including by releasing some of Haqqani's imprisoned relatives. Others bemoan the idea of talks as surrender, though many critics remain enthusiastic about reconciliation in Afghanistan. Javed Ashraf Qazi, a senator and former intelligence chief, said the Afghan Taliban is fighting a foreign occupation, while the Pakistani Taliban seeks to create an Islamic caliphate. "These are our own citizens who have revolted against the state and therefore they should be subjected to the law," Qazi said. "They have the blood of innocent people on their hands." The military and the Taliban are "happy nowadays because there are fewer attacks - on both sides," Yousafzai said.