Britain, and more importantly Prime Minister David Cameron, has been in the spotlight lately for all the wrong reasons. It has been facing a backlash from a coalition of human rights groups on Wednesday, which criticised Britain for weapons transfers to Saudi Arabia, claiming that arms sales to Riyadh would violate a global treaty regulating trade in munitions. David Cameron on the other hand has been blamed for squandering nearly £400 million in taxpayers’ aid to Yemen through its support for the Saudi-led military offensive in the country’s civil war. The destructive role that the UK is playing in the war is burdening its economy and shifting the political atmosphere in the country.

The civil war in Yemen has led to the collapse of the government, left more than two million people homeless and pushed the country to the brink of famine. The chaos is also helping jihadists from al-Qaeda and the Islamic State cement their foothold – the very outcome Britain lavished aid on Yemen to avoid. An air strike by the Saudi-led coalition hit a relief warehouse run by Oxfam, while the Save the Children has had two of its bases destroyed. Both charities’ aid efforts in Yemen are funded in part by DFID. Britain’s humanitarian and foreign policy are pursuing different ends entirely and this Britain must realise. The support for Saudi coalition must stop if it hopes to purge itself from the war atrocities being committed in Yemen.

Nearly 6,000 people, almost half of them civilians, have died since Saudi-led air strikes began in March. This cannot be contributed to the UK alone as the US The approved an arms sale which is worth $1.29 billion and includes 13,000 precision guided weapons, in November as part of the Obama administration’s pledge to boost military support for the Gulf States. There is a definite shift in the way that the West views its relationship with Saudi Arabia. Western policymakers know that the battle with jihadism is as much about ideology as guns. When they look for a source of the ISIS worldview, they increasingly trace it back to the Wahhabi philosophy promoted by the Saudi religious establishment. Yet the pour guns and money into the Kingdom. Saudi money speaks louder than any foreign policy, be it national or international. It is the reason that Pakistan has been coerced to be a part of a coalition it is clueless about.