Head of the internationally-recognized Presidential Council in Libya affirmed Tuesday that peace would not be achieved before ceasing all acts of hostility in the country.

Fayez al-Sarraj, upon his meeting with Algerian Foreign Minister Sabri Boukadoum said that "talking about peace is futile without stopping hostilities, returning the displaced, and ensuring the capital's safety."

Boukadoum arrived earlier on Tuesday in the Libyan capital Tripoli to hold talks with officials. 

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Al-Sarraj, according to his information office, thanked Algeria for what he described as political and diplomatic efforts to achieve stability in Libya, stressing the depth of ties between the two "brotherly countries".

For his part, Boukadoum, according to the same statement, reiterated his country's support for al-Sarraj-headed UN-recognized Government of National Accord (GNA) and his country's "categorical rejection" of Libya's eastern-based warlord Khalifa Haftar's attack on Tripoli.

He added that there is no military solution to the crisis, and "Algeria will make every effort to stop the war."

Boukadoum's visit came days after he met with Haftar in the city of Benghazi earlier this month.

Algeria has been conducting a shuttle diplomacy in recent weeks to defuse tension in war-torn Libya and foster the ceasefire in Tripoli.

Since early April, forces loyal to Haftar have been launching a campaign to capture Tripoli from the GNA forces.

Clashes between the two sides since then have left more than 1,000 people dead and about 5,500 wounded, according to the World Health Organization.

Libya has remained beset by turmoil since 2011, when long-time ruler Muammar Gaddafi was ousted and killed in a bloody NATO-backed uprising after four decades in power.

The oil-rich country has since seen the emergence of two rival seats of power: one in eastern Libya, with which Haftar is affiliated, and the Tripoli-based GNA, which enjoys the UN recognition.