ISTANBUL: Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan says he would approve the revival of the death penalty in Turkey if the Turkish parliament opts to reintroduce the measure.

“This issue will be discussed in parliament. These villains bombed [places] and I believe that political parties at the parliament will give the best decision.

As the approval authority, I hereby announce my decision that if they make such a move, I will approve it,” Erdogan said, referring to those involved in a recent failed coup in the country.

He was speaking to his supporters during a rally outside his residence in the country’s largest city of Istanbul early on Tuesday.

The restoration of the death penalty , which was annulled in Turkey in 2004 under reforms aimed at joining the European Union (EU), would be meant to allow the execution of those believed to have been involved in the coup.

The crackdown that has been launched in Turkey following the coup, including the mass arrests of suspects and the talk of reviving the death penalty , has raised international concern.

Erdogan added that the government is making “critical preparations” to take an important decision in response to the Friday coup attempt, which claimed the lives of more than 200 people and left nearly 1,500 others wounded.

Officials said some 100 coup plotters were additionally killed until government rule was restored on Saturday.

“We will convene the National Security Council on Wednesday. After the National Security Council meeting, we will gather for a cabinet meeting. As a result of these meetings, we will announce an important decision,” the Turkish president said in his Tuesday remarks.

Sources in Turkey’s Interior Ministry said on Monday that a total of 8,777 public personnel had been dismissed from their official positions since the coup against the government was declared.

Turkish officials have launched a large-scale crackdown following the failed coup attempt.

Prime Minister Binali Yildirim says over 7,500 suspects have been arrested over the coup attempt, explaining that more than 750 judges and prosecutors are among the detainees.