MEXICO CITY : Tropical storm Raymond homed in Sunday on the southwest coast of Mexico, which is still recovering from devastating tropical storm hit just last month.

Raymond, which grew to tropical storm strength in the early hours of the morning, “is getting better organized south of the coast of Guerrero and moving to the northwest,” according to the latest report from Mexico’s national weather service.

It was expected to “slowly approach the coast of Mexico... late Monday or Tuesday,” according to the Miami-based National Hurricane Center. The storm — which at 1230 GMT was 295 kilometers southeast of the tourist resort town of Acapulco — was dumping heavy rains and sparking waves two to three meters (6.5 to 10 feet) high. It boasted sustained winds of 65 kilometers an hour, with gusts up to 85 kilometers an hour.

Guerrero’s governor called a tropical storm warning in the center and south of the state and closed waterways to “smaller boats for river fishing and recreation,” a statement said.

Meanwhile, the interior ministry announced late Saturday it is sending “human and material resources to different sectors of the state” where temporary shelters were being opened and cautionary evacuations being done.

In mid-September, Tropical Storm Manuel made landfall in Guerrero, while another weather system, Ingrid, slammed almost simultaneously into the opposite coast.

The two storms claimed 157 lives and left 1.7 million people homeless. Their effects were felt across two-thirds of the country, but hardest hit was Guerrero, where landslides partially buried a mountain community and 101 of the deaths were recorded.

The unusual double storm blast occurred during a holiday weekend leaving thousands of tourists stranded in Acapulco when airports and highways were closed.