Islamabad-Earth’s oceans help to slow global warming by absorbing carbon from our atmosphere – but fully observing this crucial process in the upper ocean and lower atmosphere is difficult, as measurements are taken not where it occurs, the sea surface, but several meters below. New research uses data from ESA, NASA, and NOAA satellites to rectify this, and finds that far more carbon is absorbed by the oceans than previously thought. Much of the carbon dioxide emitted by human activity does not stay in the atmosphere but is taken up by oceans and land vegetation – so-called “carbon sinks.” There are ongoing efforts to collect and compile in situ measurements of the ocean sink in the form of the Surface Ocean CO₂ Atlas, or SOCAT, which contains over 28 million international observations of our oceans and coastal seas from 1957 to 2020. By delving into SOCAT’s vast database, scientists can identify how much carbon is being sucked out of the atmosphere and stored by our seas.