The Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif is often termed as the saviour of the nation by his party workers; likewise, speaking on an occasion, the Chief Justice of Pakistan said that the people have started considering the Judiciary as its saviour now. In fact, the Pakistani nation has a unique privilege of having so many saviours since independence. We have been witnessing both the democrats and the dictators as being ‘saviours of the nation’ acting in the ‘supreme national interests’ to save the nation from the internal and external dangers. In case the democratic saviours fails, the ‘defenders of the frontiers’ come to rescue the nation. Now, this position has been readily replaced by the ‘guardians of the constitution’ protecting the fundamental rights of people of the nation by acting ‘on its own motion’. Ironically, the nation has always welcomed all kinds of saviours to ensure its salvation and survival.

Recently, a cricketer-turned-politician pledging to build ‘New Pakistan’ has managed to make his entry into the list of theses savoiurs. On the other hand, before the elections, another savior, holding dual nationality, suddenly emerged on the national horizon demanding the drastic electoral reforms in the country. Likewise, we have also witnessed a renowned nuclear scientist making some sincere endeavors in setting things right in the country through a political platform during the recent elections. Although all these saviours have somehow failed in achieving their desired goals but, surely, a considerable segment of the people has trusted and supported them.

Paradoxically, both the savoiurs and the nation have been obsessed with the idea of revolution, to break the status quo, ignoring the importance and need of the evolution for the same. This is the reason that the nation always finds itself in a blind alley while following these saviours at the end of the day. As a matter of fact, there is no fault with these ‘untiring’, ‘hard-working’ and ‘dedicated’ saviours. Perhaps, the fault lies with the nation that wants a change, without changing itself, and is in the habit of seeking the instant remedies for its constant maladies.

MOHSIN RAZA MALIK,

Lahore, June 23.