Islamabad    -   Prime Minister Imran Khan on Friday urged the international community to prosecute the Indian civil and military personnel involved in state terrorism and serious crimes against humanity in Indian Illegally Occupied Jammu and Kashmir (IIOJK).

In his virtual address to the 75th session of the UN General Assembly, the prime minister spoke about a host of issues, ranging from Kashmir dispute, peace in Afghanistan, Islamophobia, plight of minorities in India, COVID-19 pandemic to the issue of climate change.

He also warned that India had ‘upped its military ante’ against Pakistan in order to divert attention from its domestic problems.

The prime minister asked the global community to investigate the grave human rights violations, being perpetrated with complete impunity in IIOJK by the Indian occupation forces.

Highlighting the Indian atrocities against the Kashmiri people, the prime minister said these were well-documented in several reports, including that of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights.

He said India illegally and unilaterally sought to change the status of occupied territory on fifth August last year and deployed additional troops, bringing the total number to 900,000 to impose a military siege on eight million Kashmiris.

All Kashmiri political leaders were incarcerated; about 13,000 Kashmiri youth were abducted and thousands tortured; a complete curfew was imposed, accompanied by a total communications blackout.

Imran Khan said India had extra-judicially murdered hundreds of innocent young Kashmiris in fake ‘encounters’, refusing even to hand over their bodies for burial. The Kashmiri media, and those daring to raise their voice, are being systematically harassed and intimidated through the use of draconian laws.

The prime minister said the military siege is being followed by moves to change the demographic structure of the occupied territory.

This is an attempt to obliterate the distinct Kashmiri identity in order to affect the outcome of a plebiscite envisaged in the UN Security Council resolutions.

Imran Khan said brave Kashmiri people will never submit to Indian occupation and oppression. Their struggle is indigenous. They are fighting for a just cause and generation after generation have laid down their lives to rid themselves of Indian occupation.

The prime minister reaffirmed Pakistan’s commitment to stand by their Kashmiri brothers and sisters in their legitimate struggle for self-determination.

On the Islamophobia, Imran Khan cautioned against the rising tide of Islamophobia around the world and called upon the United Nations to play its part in combating religious hatred.

The prime minister lamented that at a time when the global community should have come together to combat the novel coronavirus, it had instead stoked racism and religious hatred. “Unfortunately, it has instead fanned nationalism, increased global tensions and given rise to racial and religious hatred and violence against vulnerable minorities in several places.”

Islamophobia was rising in several countries, he said, adding that Muslims were being ‘targeted with impunity’, mosques were being desecrated and Prophet Muhammad (PBUH) was being insulted ‘in the name of freedom of speech’.

“We stress that willful provocations and incitement to hate and violence must be universally outlawed,” the premier said, adding that the UNGA should “declare an international day to combat Islamophobia”.

“We believe that the driving force in international relations must be cooperation in accordance with the principles of international law and not confrontation and force. We all must emphatically reaffirm our support for multilateralism,” he said.

“The Covid-19 pandemic has illustrated the oneness of humanity. No one is safe unless everyone is safe,” he said.

The prime minister also highlighted Pakistan’s efforts to curb the coronavirus and noted that Pakistan’s response was recognised as one of the ‘success stories’ in controlling the disease.

“However, we are still not out of the woods like no country is out of the woods today,” said the prime minister, adding that from the outset of the pandemic, developing countries were at a disadvantage due to lack of resources and would require fiscal space to cope with the economic fallout caused by the health crisis.

He recalled that earlier this year, he had called upon developed countries and global financial institutions to provide debt relief to poor countries so that they could fight against the virus, and added that further similar measures will be required for developing nations.

He also drew UNGA’s attention towards money laundering and corruption by the elite of developing countries who stash their wealth in tax havens in developed countries and explained how such practices affect the economies of financially-poor nations.

“Since they are beneficiaries, there is a lack of political will in the rich countries to curb this criminal activity,” he declared and added that if money launderers were provided with sanctuaries, the gulf between poor and rich countries will continue to grow and would lead to “a far bigger global crisis than the present migration issue poses”.

The prime minister also spoke about Israel’s occupation of Palestine and said that “a just and lasting settlement is indispensable for the Middle East and actually the world”.

Prime Minister Imran said that the “illegal annexations” of Palestinian lands, the building of illegal settlements and imposing “inhumane living conditions” on Palestinian people could not lead to peace.

He said that Pakistan supported a two-state solution “in line with the UNGA and UNSC resolutions within the international agreed parameters; and they are pre-1967 borders and Al-Quds Al-Shareef as the capital of a united, contiguous and independent Palestinian state”.

The premier also sounded the alarm on the danger posed by climate change, saying that recent “unprecedented” fires in Australia, Brazil and various parts of the world as well as record temperatures “should make all of us worried for our future generations”. He insisted that the commitments made at the Paris Summit be fulfilled. He pointed out that even though Pakistan’s contribution to global carbon emissions was ‘minimal’, the country faces greater risk from climate change.

“The United Nations should be made fully responsive to the challenges of our times. A comprehensive reform of the United Nations, including the Security Council, is essential to promote greater democracy, accountability, transparency and efficiency,” the prime minister insisted.

of minorities in India, COVID-19 pandemic to the issue of climate change.

He also warned that India had ‘upped its military ante’ against Pakistan in order to divert attention from its domestic problems.

The prime minister asked the global community to investigate the grave human rights violations, being perpetrated with complete impunity in IIOJK by the Indian occupation forces.

Highlighting the Indian atrocities against the Kashmiri people, the prime minister said these were well-documented in several reports, including that of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights.

He said India illegally and unilaterally sought to change the status of occupied territory on fifth August last year and deployed additional troops, bringing the total number to 900,000 to impose a military siege on eight million Kashmiris.

All Kashmiri political leaders were incarcerated; about 13,000 Kashmiri youth were abducted and thousands tortured; a complete curfew was imposed, accompanied by a total communications blackout.

Imran Khan said India had extra-judicially murdered hundreds of innocent young Kashmiris in fake ‘encounters’, refusing even to hand over their bodies for burial. The Kashmiri media, and those daring to raise their voice, are being systematically harassed and intimidated through the use of draconian laws.

The prime minister said the military siege is being followed by moves to change the demographic structure of the occupied territory.

This is an attempt to obliterate the distinct Kashmiri identity in order to affect the outcome of a plebiscite envisaged in the UN Security Council resolutions.

Imran Khan said brave Kashmiri people will never submit to Indian occupation and oppression. Their struggle is indigenous. They are fighting for a just cause and generation after generation have laid down their lives to rid themselves of Indian occupation.

The prime minister reaffirmed Pakistan’s commitment to stand by their Kashmiri brothers and sisters in their legitimate struggle for self-determination.

On the Islamophobia, Imran Khan cautioned against the rising tide of Islamophobia around the world and called upon the United Nations to play its part in combating religious hatred.

The prime minister lamented that at a time when the global community should have come together to combat the novel coronavirus, it had instead stoked racism and religious hatred. “Unfortunately, it has instead fanned nationalism, increased global tensions and given rise to racial and religious hatred and violence against vulnerable minorities in several places.”

Islamophobia was rising in several countries, he said, adding that Muslims were being ‘targeted with impunity’, mosques were being desecrated and Prophet Muhammad (PBUH) was being insulted ‘in the name of freedom of speech’.

“We stress that willful provocations and incitement to hate and violence must be universally outlawed,” the premier said, adding that the UNGA should “declare an international day to combat Islamophobia”.

“We believe that the driving force in international relations must be cooperation in accordance with the principles of international law and not confrontation and force. We all must emphatically reaffirm our support for multilateralism,” he said.

“The Covid-19 pandemic has illustrated the oneness of humanity. No one is safe unless everyone is safe,” he said.

The prime minister also highlighted Pakistan’s efforts to curb the coronavirus and noted that Pakistan’s response was recognised as one of the ‘success stories’ in controlling the disease.  “However, we are still not out of the woods like no country is out of the woods today,” said the prime minister, adding that from the outset of the pandemic, developing countries were at a disadvantage due to lack of resources and would require fiscal space to cope with the economic fallout caused by the health crisis.

He recalled that earlier this year, he had called upon developed countries and global financial institutions to provide debt relief to poor countries so that they could fight against the virus, and added that further similar measures will be required for developing nations.

He also drew UNGA’s attention towards money laundering and corruption by the elite of developing countries who stash their wealth in tax havens in developed countries and explained how such practices affect the economies of financially-poor nations.

“Since they are beneficiaries, there is a lack of political will in the rich countries to curb this criminal activity,” he declared and added that if money launderers were provided with sanctuaries, the gulf between poor and rich countries will continue to grow and would lead to “a far bigger global crisis than the present migration issue poses”.

The prime minister also spoke about Israel’s occupation of Palestine and said that “a just and lasting settlement is indispensable for the Middle East and actually the world”.

Prime Minister Imran said that the “illegal annexations” of Palestinian lands, the building of illegal settlements and imposing “inhumane living conditions” on Palestinian people could not lead to peace.

He said that Pakistan supported a two-state solution “in line with the UNGA and UNSC resolutions within the international agreed parameters; and they are pre-1967 borders and Al-Quds Al-Shareef as the capital of a united, contiguous and independent Palestinian state”.