Johannesburg - Steven Smith, David Warner and Cameron Bancroft will leave South Africa on Wednesday in the wake of their pre-meditated plan to tamper with the ball on the third day of the Cape Town Test against South Africa. Australia have named Matt Renshaw, Glenn Maxwell and Joe Burns as replacements for the fourth Test in Johannesburg starting on Friday.

Australia coach Darren Lehmann was found to have had no prior knowledge of the ball-tampering plan, and will remain in his position. Wicketkeeper Tim Paine has been officially appointed captain of the Australian team; he had led the team on the fourth day of the Newlands Test after Smith and Warner were stood down as captain and vice-captain. That decision, which was soon followed by ICC sanctions for Smith and Bancroft, had been taken following tremendous pressure from back home, including the Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull.

CA chief executive James Sutherland made the latest announcements at a press conference in Johannesburg on Tuesday during which he apologised for the Australian team's conduct at Newlands. He said that the Cricket Australia investigation had found that only Smith, Warner and Bancroft had been in on the plot to tamper with the ball, and that "significant" sanctions would be issued in 24 hours once the investigations were completed.

"In view of the broader reputational and integrity issues involved, the sanctions that will be contemplated are significant," Sutherland said. "The process must therefore be thorough to ensure that all relevant issues have been examined. I understand the appetite for urgency given the reputation of Australia as a sporting nation has been damaged in the eyes of many. However, urgency must be balanced with due process given the serious implications for all involved. In addition to sanctions for individuals, Cricket Australia will initiate an independent review into the conduct and culture of our Australian men's teams. We will have more to say about this review in the coming days, but it will be conducted by an expert panel who will report to the Cricket Australia Board."

CA chairman, David Peever said: "We understand and share the anger of fans and the broader Australian community about the events that unfolded in Cape Town on Saturday. This issue goes beyond the technical nature of the offences and various codes of conduct. It is about the integrity and reputation of Australian Cricket and Australian sport. Ultimately, it is about whether Australians can feel proud of their national sporting teams. That depends as much on the way the players conduct themselves, as it does about winning or losing."

Sutherland said they would use this as an opportunity to "review the culture and conduct of our international teams". "If this has damaged ability of kids to play the game, love the game and idolise their heroes it is a sorry state and we need to do everything we can to address it."

Former Australian coach John Buchanan, who led the team from 1999 to 2007, said Smith must resign as captain and urged cricket chiefs to be fully transparent in their investigation. "It is a very difficult time for members of Australian cricket; however, I believe there is a golden opportunity to reset the dial around player and staff behaviours, actions and decision-making," he told reporters.

There has been a national outcry over Smith's admission that the "leadership group" within the team decided to cheat. That group of senior players usually includes fast bowlers Josh Hazlewood and Mitchell Starc, but they are reportedly furious at being embroiled in the saga.

The ramifications of the scandal have been far-reaching with the Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC), the guardian of the laws of the game, calling for a "major shift in attitude" to preserve the game for future generations.

Smith insisted it was the first time his team had cheated in this manner, but former England captain Michael Vaughan claimed he is "pretty sure" Australia were ball-tampering during their 4-0 victory in the Ashes, which finished earlier this year. "I look at the amount of tape some of the fielders have worn, particularly during the Ashes series at mid-on and mid-off. You don't have to name names, they know who they are," he told BBC Sport.

 

 Five who could succeed Smith as captain

Tim Paine

 

Was seen as a surprise choice when drafted in to replace Smith when he stood down as skipper for the remainder of the third Test in Cape Town after the scandal erupted. The 33-year-old wicket-keeper had been a shock selection for the recent Ashes series after six years in the wilderness. But as an elder-statesman with a calm head, he could get the nod.

Mitchell Marsh

 

The 26-year-old all-rounder has been in good form with bat and ball and could be a solid long-term pick. After a period of mediocre performances, he has now established himself as a near permanent fixture in the team. The son of former national coach Geoff, he has honed his leadership skills as skipper of Western Australia.

Usman Khawaja

 

An outsider, but the top-order batsman has plenty of experience and patience. Born in Pakistan, the 31-year-old has displayed composure at difficult times and shown his credentials as captain during a stint in charge at Queensland and on the Australia A tour of India in 2015. He is also man in form in domestic circuit.

Pat Cummins

 

The tearaway paceman is widely regarded and has youth on his side at age 24. It is highly unusual to have a fast bowler as captain and the burden may be too much, but if cricket chiefs are looking for a fresh start, he could be the man to take them forward. Was tipped earlier this year by Michael Clarke as a captain-in-waiting.

Michael Clarke

 

Michael Clarke was Smith's predecessor, retiring in 2015 after playing 115 Tests. Now a TV commentator, he suggested at the weekend he was open to a return. "If I was asked by the right people, then I would think about my answer," the 36-year-old told Australia's Nine Network, although he is seen as a real wildcard.